Monday, April 9, 2018

Oh what tangled webs we weave

Trump attorney Cohen is being investigated for possible bank fraud, campaign finance violations, according to a person familiar with the case

Michael Cohen, the longtime attorney of President Trump, is under federal investigation for possible bank fraud, wire fraud and campaign finance violations, according to three people with knowledge of the case.

FBI agents on Monday raided Cohen’s Manhattan office, home and hotel room as part of the investigation, seizing records about Cohen’s clients and personal finances. Among the records taken were those related to a 2016 payment Cohen made to adult-film star Stormy Daniels, who claims to have had a sexual encounter with Trump, according to another person familiar with the investigation.
Follow the money


Friday, April 6, 2018

Trump and the “nontariff barrier” - TARIFF

This guy Trump is something else. He has a funny way of starting a trade war when he wants to raise the price of all automobiles sold in  America, both foreign and domestic. I mean really, are we to believe foreign imports must increase their prices that domestic car manufacturers won't take advantage of that to raise the price of their cars?

U.S. Looks to Protect Domestic Car Makers From Foreign Competition

Trump administration is examining stricter enforcement of environmental rules on imported vehicles


The Trump administration is pursuing ways to protect domestic vehicle manufacturing by forcing imported cars to meet stricter environmental rules when entering the country, according to senior administration and industry officials, a move that would make imports more expensive.

The cost of meeting the stiffer import standards would, at least in part, be passed along to U.S. consumers. This style of “nontariff barrier”—a protectionist stratagem the U.S. has long condemned in other countries—is designed to reduce the relative cost of cars manufactured in the U.S., by American workers, the officials said.
Mr. Trump has asked the Environmental Protection Agency and several other agencies, including the Commerce and Transportation departments, to pursue plans to use such laws as the Clean Air Act to subject cars made overseas to strict emissions-standards testing and reviews when entering the U.S. The rules could effectively require more expensive technology on some foreign cars or subject those cars to more expensive hurdles that can be billed to the manufacturer or importer.

Monday, February 19, 2018

It is nice to see at least some deportations are done. I am loathed to give the Trump credit, but I must.


Inside and Immigration Roundup


LOS ANGELES—Gathered in an underground parking garage before dawn on a chilly February morning, a group of eight armed immigration officers listened closely to the details of seven people wanted for immigration violations.
There was the Guatemalan man convicted of battery; a possible gang member with multiple felony convictions; a Salvadoran national and green card holder with a grand theft conviction; several sex offenders, and a man who spent time in jail as a juvenile.

Soon, they would drive into densely packed neighborhoods across the city to find and arrest the men at their homes. If someone runs, the lead officer instructed, don’t chase “unless they are right there.” Just before 6 a.m., officers maneuvered unmarked sport-utility vehicles in front of a three-story apartment building just west of downtown Los Angeles. They were here for the Guatemalan.
Across the country, groups like this one—called fugitive operations teams—are tracking and arresting illegal immigrants living in the U.S. The operations are a crucial piece of President Donald Trump’s promise to crack down on illegal immigration, and have intensified under his administration.

Monday, February 5, 2018

Melania Trump Gives Her Own State Of The Union

Trump, No concept why Civil Service works

That Trump guy has no concept of history, how and why things got to be where they are. All Trump guy knows is what he wants without respect to how it affects everybody else, or the sense of common decency.

The corrupt, racist proposal from the State of the Union address that everyone missed


President Trump's proposed changes to the government workforce sound reasonable, but would actually undo more than a century of reforms.

Standing in front of a divided Congress, with possible obstruction charges looming over him and facing governance struggles produced by his ineffective leadership, the president sought to undermine a 135-year-old law protecting federal civil servants from the whims of tyrants and hacks. “I call on the Congress to empower every Cabinet secretary with the authority to reward good workers — and to remove federal employees who undermine the public trust or fail the American people,” he said.

While this plea sounds sensible, it actually represents a historic threat to the U.S. government and to some of its most vulnerable citizens. Recognizing that threat requires understanding two crucial and related pieces of context — first, how the law Trump seeks to dissolve came into being, and second, how the effort to undermine it fits into a larger pattern of racist ideas driving the Trump administration’s actions.

Why can’t a Cabinet secretary simply fire federal employees? Before 1883, they did just that on a regular basis. Federal employees came and went on the orders of political appointees with each electoral cycle. Every four years, federal workers sat waiting with bags packed to find out if their party would hold on to power and they onto their livelihoods.

Claiming these spoils of victory enabled a president and his Cabinet secretaries to hand out high-paying, desirable jobs to political supporters. Abraham Lincoln famously — or infamously — cleaned house in 1861 to reward his new political party whose members had not tasted federal salaries since the collapse of the Whig party a decade earlier.

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